Hemudu

Hemudu

Hemudu Site. Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:The_totem_of _Hemudu_Cultural_Site.JPG

Hemudu is on the coastal plain of Shanghai and dates back to ca. 6000 BC. The area is teeming with life: forests, pastures, streams, lakes, ponds, and marshes waterlogged the area, providing adequate preservation for ancient artifacts. Anthropologists found timber longhouses constructed using mortise and tenon joints that were neatly built along the water’s edge. Cultural artifacts were found in the area such as simple pottery decorated with cord impressions, indicating they were used for cooking and storage. Agricultural artifacts found include fish hooks, arrowheads, chisels, awls, needles, weaving shuttles, hoes, spears, mallets, spades, and paddles made from wood, bamboo, and bone. Also, an enormous quantity of domestic rice stalks, husks, leaves, and grains were discovered, proving that rice was domesticated. Different skeletal structures of pigs, water buffalo, and dogs were found as well, indicating that rice wasn’t the only thing that was domesticated in Hemudu. Hemudu was wrought with wildlife as well: acorns and water chestnuts could be find near the campsite, and waterfowl, deer, rhinoceros, elephants, alligators, and tortoises inhabit the surrounding areas. (1)

(1) Barker, G. (2009). The agricultural revolution in prehistory: Why did foragers become farmers?. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp. 195-198.